Home
Blogs/Articles
Top Careers
Business Careers
Animal Related
Aptitude Tests
Career Tests
Wonderlic
IQ Tests
Personality Tests
Career Change
About  Intelligence
GMAT
GRE
SAT
Resume Writing
Interview Tips
Find Jobs
Site Map
Privacy
Disclaimer
Feedback

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines

The Right Interview Answers to Tricky Questions

How do you answer questions without jeopardizing your job? Sometimes, applicants are too eager to answer interview questions in the belief that a prompt answer makes them smart. Most of the times, they feel sorry the minute they answered the questions. The right interview answers are those that were carefully thought of.

The interview answers you give to your interviewer will make or break you in terms of the job seeking process. Now that you have gotten past the entrance examinations and aptitude tests that your employer asked you to take, it is time to prepare for the interview. If you think all it takes to answer interview questions is honesty and being polite, you are mistaken. Questions can be tough and it is important that your answers are witty without making you look like a smarty pants. In this article, we have collected several of the toughest interview questions that you may be asked and we will be providing tips on how you should provide acceptable interview answers.

The Confidence Test

Many employers will ask you this question: “What makes you think you are qualified for this job?” Questions such as this are a test of your confidence. This question also wants to find out how you look at yourself in comparison with the other applicants. The danger with many interview answers for this question is the possibility of sounding conceited.

What you need to do is to prepare some questions to ask the employer or interviewer about the things they expect from, the person who will fill this position. Ask the interviewer if it is alright to ask these questions. He would be unreasonable if he refuses to answer. Once you get the permission, ask the interviewer questions that will help you understand the job requirements. Definitely, you can squeeze out the job responsibilities or requirements for the position and you can build your answer from there. Focus on the things you have accomplished that relate to the needs or requirements of the position.

The Loyalty Test

Interview answers for loyalty questions may sound easy but these questions are tricky. The interviewer may ask you questions like “Why do you want to work for our company?” or “How long do you think will you stay in our company?” If you answer too quickly, your answer may sound so canned and prepared to an extent that it is not very convincing. Mull over the question first and keep in mind that if you have a history of very short employment, your loyalty may be further put in question.

Questions about working for a particular employer is based on the assumption that you want to work for him. After all, you applied to the job posting. What you need to tell the interviewer should be related to your values. For example, you need to tell the employer that you like challenges and want to be a part of the core team if the company is new.

If the company is old and well established, tell the employer that you are a firm individual and that you want to make contributions to a great company such as theirs. Never give interview answers in which you are practically telling them that you want to learn and benefit from them. Employers want to benefit from you so focus on what you can do for them.

The Honesty Test

This is the time where your interview answers should be brief or concise. The more you talk, the more likely you are opening a can of worms for the interviewer to pry deeper. Questions to test your honesty are “Why are you leaving your present employer?” or “What are your greatest weaknesses?”

Interview answers that work when asked this question are those that reverse the situation. Ask the interviewer if knows of behavioral issues in his workplace that is currently a problem. Once you have been told what these are, tell the employer that you do not possess these characters. If you are applying for a leadership position, explain how your experiences in handling employees who had unbecoming attitudes towards work.

Another approach to this tricky question is to think of weaknesses that can be viewed as strengths. Tell the employer or the interviewer that you are a workaholic and that this gets in the way of your personal life. This by itself is a weakness that the employer can use to his advantage. If asked why you are leaving the company, it is enough to say that you are looking for greener pastures. Never bad-mouth a former employer.

Home
Job Interview Advice
Second Job Interview
Interview Thank You Letter
Interview Questions
Salary Negotiation